Wildlife & Plants Photos

Foxes of the Greater Wapusk Ecosystem

A collection of photos of Arctic and red foxes from the Greater Wapusk Ecosystem. Click through the slideshow to see how Arctic fox coats change through the seasons – from snow white in the winter, to a scraggly mix of brown/white when they molt, to brown and tan in the summer breeding months.

Arctic fox in winter on the Wapusk tundra
Arctic fox in winter on the Wapusk tundra

C. Warret Rodrigues

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Arctic fox staredown
Arctic fox staredown

Arctic foxes generally have bold temperaments and will often come up to us on the tundra while we are doing field work. C. Warret Rodrigues

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The glare of the sun
The glare of the sun

Foxes eye pigmentation helps to reduce the glare of the sun from snow and ice. C. Warrett Rodrigues

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Arctic fox in winter on the Wapusk tundra
Arctic fox in winter on the Wapusk tundra

C. Warret Rodrigues

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Other wildlife in the Greater Wapusk Ecosystem

Due to the diversity of habitats within the Greater Wapusk Ecosystem, a wide variety of wildlife can be found throughout our study area. Other notable wildlife include polar bears, wolves, caribou, collared lemmings, meadow voles, bald and golden eagles, snowy owls, ptarmigan, Canada geese, snow geese, sandhill cranes, Arctic terns, parasitic jaegers, sandpipers, Arctic hares, and red squirrels, to name a few.

Arctic hare on alert.
Arctic hare on alert.

A. Moizan

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Arctic hares boxing
Arctic hares boxing

Arctic hares will ‘box’ in the breeding season and typically occurs when a male is too persistent to breed with a female. C. Warrett Rodrigues

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A caribou skull on the tundra
A caribou skull on the tundra

Life can be very hard for caribou during winter. With little food available, winter mortality can be substantial from year to year. A. Moizan

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Arctic hare on alert.
Arctic hare on alert.

A. Moizan

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Flora of the Greater Wapusk Ecosystem

Similar to wildlife, there is a relatively high diversity of plant life within the Greater Wapusk Ecosystem for an Arctic ecosystem.

Reindeer lichen
Reindeer lichen

Reindeer lichen gets its name because it is one of the main food sources for caribou on the tundra. C. Warrett Rodrigues

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Small round-leaved orchid
Small round-leaved orchid

C. Warrett Rodrigues

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Cloudberry emerging
Cloudberry emerging

C. Warrett Rodrigues

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Reindeer lichen
Reindeer lichen

Reindeer lichen gets its name because it is one of the main food sources for caribou on the tundra. C. Warrett Rodrigues

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