Photos of the Greater Wapusk Ecosystem

Landscapes of the Greater Wapusk Ecosystem

A collection of photos of the lands in and around the Greater Wapusk Ecosystem. This ecosystem sits at the intersection of three major biomes — the tundra, boreal forest (taiga), and ocean (Hudson Bay) — creating a unique assemblage of habitats.

The taiga-marine interface in winter
The taiga-marine interface in winter

In parts of the Greater Wapusk Ecosystem, the treeline runs into the coastline. A. Moizan

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A small tundra tree island in winter
A small tundra tree island in winter

Pockets of sparse trees are interspersed across the tundra, and these are commonly referred to as "tree islands". A. Moizan

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Gardens on the beach
Gardens on the beach

The vast majority of Arctic fox dens in Wapusk are situated on the beach ridges that formed after the last ice age. The ridges are slightly elevated and well-drained compared to the rest of the tundra, providing rare dry spots in the wetland-dominant ecosystem. Some of these fox dens may contain as many as 100 burrow entrances, and be 50 m or more in diameter! S. Johnson-Bice

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The taiga-marine interface in winter
The taiga-marine interface in winter

In parts of the Greater Wapusk Ecosystem, the treeline runs into the coastline. A. Moizan

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Camps, buildings, and the surrounding area

A collection of photos of our remote satellite research camps, the Churchill Northern Studies Centre campus, and landmarks from around the Churchill area.

Nester One research station in Wapusk National Park
Nester One research station in Wapusk National Park

Nester One was established in 1969 to study Canada geese ecology, before Wapusk National Park was established in 1996. Today, Nester One is the hub of many research projects ranging from plants to caribou to geese, and is the main satellite camp that our project conducts research out of. C. Kucheravy

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Sunrise at the Nester One satellite camp
Sunrise at the Nester One satellite camp

Visitors and scientists alike have always claimed Nester One is one of the best places to watch the sunrise/sunset. C. Kucheravy

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The Ithaca shipwreck at low tide
The Ithaca shipwreck at low tide

The Ithaca is a popular tourist destination during low tide. However, an abundance of caution is needed to visit the shipwreck! Polar bears are also frequent visitors to the ship, so all visitors should be accompanied by a trained and armed professional. Additionally, the ship is actively decaying, and the rusting metal poses serious hazards for those who climb it. C. Warrett Rodrigues

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Nester One research station in Wapusk National Park
Nester One research station in Wapusk National Park

Nester One was established in 1969 to study Canada geese ecology, before Wapusk National Park was established in 1996. Today, Nester One is the hub of many research projects ranging from plants to caribou to geese, and is the main satellite camp that our project conducts research out of. C. Kucheravy

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